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You can put them in a house, you can add a mini mouse, you probably shouldn't put them in a box or share them with a fox but, you can put them here or there. You can put them anywhere. We do love terrariums and dish gardens. We do love them, Sam I am. Ok, thanks for indulging that earworm.

Back to the matter at hand—Terrariums and dish gardens are a great way to bring some small scale green into your home or office. They're also a great way to get kids interested in plants and growing things.

Choosing Your Container

You can create gardens in almost any kind of container. For enclosed terrariums, we recommend using a glass vessel that does not have drainage. It can be anything from a standard enclosed terrarium, a lantern or even a mason jar for an extra ...

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Pollination is necessary for plants to reproduce. The term “pollinator” means butterflies, hummingbirds, beetles, birds, bees, and other creatures that transport pollen. Bees have unfairly garnered a negative reputation. The truth is that most bees don’t sting, so you can safely watch them without fear, from a polite distance, while they go about their business of pollination. Just remember to avoid bees’ nests and remain calm, moving in a non-threatening manner. If you are If you’re allergic to bees, keep plants that attract bees in the back of your garden to allow pollination, yet a peaceful co-existence.

5 Top Tips to “Bee” Kind to Pollinators

1. Avoid pesticides which also harms good insects. This hungry caterpillar recently photographed on a...

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June is National Perennial Gardening Month! Perennials are near and dear to our heart at TGP, as we started our roots in Naperville as Emma’s Perennials in 1936. Some perennials have deep root systems, allowing them to survive heat and drought, once established. Most perennials will focus their energy on establishing roots in your garden over their first season, while others will be quite happy to provide lots of foliage or flower color the first season. Where annuals will provide continuous flower color throughout the season, perennials have windows of bloom during the season. This allows you to start the year with one color and transition to another throughout the year if desired. We note those perennials that are shorter lived, ...

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“You’re never too old to be young,” said Snow White, so nurture your creativity by adding a little whimsy to your garden. Bring the generations together and make your garden a magical play space for younger gardeners-to-be. Tuck in a few surprises in unexpected places.

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Mini gardening is for boy, girls, moms, dads, grandmas, and grandpas! Gardening is an expression of the artist and gnomes, fairies, even dinosaurs or mini-Minions can add a whimsical touch. This year we've added the Flower Fairies Secret Garden Series with inspiration from Cicely Mary Barker. Made of durable plastic, they are great for the tiniest of gardeners to play in the garden.

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Mini-gardening can be a gardening outlet if you live in an apartment or a gateway to larger garden projects by getting you started on a smaller scale. For children, mini-gardening can encourage respect and care for our Earth as well as starting them on a life-long hobby that is as good for our health as it is for our souls.

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THEY'RE BACK! Ruby-throated hummingbirds have made their way back to our area for the season. They have been sighted recently in Naperville and Downers Grove. If you would like to encourage these fascinating creatures to take up residence in your yard (or at least stop by to say hello), here are some things you can do to turn your yard into a hummingbird oasis.

Food

So...what should be on the menu for these beautiful and welcomed winged visitors?

FlowersGood hosts provide food for their guests, and these tiny birds have hefty appetites. According to the National Audubon Society, “hummingbirds eat every 10-15 minutes and visit 1,000-2,000 flowers per day.” Since much of the hummingbird’s day involves finding nutrition, you c...

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It’s that time of year when our thoughts turn to planting flowers. Beautiful containers can make your home look more warm and welcoming, even if you have limited space. Whether you are a beginning gardener trying out a new skill on a small scale or an experienced gardener challenging yourself to create greater drama and personality, containers are a great way to express yourself in flowers (or even veggies!)

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Great Containers

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Euphorbia polychroma or Cushion Spurge

This TGP heirloom plant 'blooms' chartreuse in spring. The mounded, light green foliage then turns a rich red in the fall making it an extravagant display for two seasons! It is a fabulous compliment for other spring bloomers such as creeping phlox. It prefers well-drained, poor to average soils and can reseed easily. Euphorbia polychroma loves sun and is also drought tolerant eventually growing 12-18" high by 18-24" wide. Attracts butterflies, is deer and rabbit resistant and is good for cutting.

Brunnera macrophylla or Siberian Forget-Me-Not

Another TGP heirloom with delightful loose clusters of sky blue flowers that are a beautiful sight in the spring. The large, medium green, heart-shaped foliage is drought tolerant. This is a long-lived and easy plant that will naturalize wit...

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Peonies (Paeonia) are nostalgic flowers whose beauty and fragrance (like roses or lilacs) often bring back fond memories. By planting a variety of peonies, you can have several weeks of bloom!

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Friday, April 28th is National Arbor Day, so plant a tree or plant a forest!

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Native plants thrive under local conditions and require less maintenance once established. That means less water, less fertilizer, and less pesticides which makes for a healthier Earth. Planting native plants is also good for beneficial insects, birds, and a whole host of wildlife.

Less is more

Less water – In a typical yard, the lawn is the most thirsty part. You can grow drought tolerant native plants to reduce water consumption. The deeper roots of many of the native plants allow them to reach further for water, help them withstand periods of less rainfall, and to reduce erosion during heavy rain.

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Aurora Location

2000 Montgomery Road,

Aurora, IL 60504

Phone. 630-820-8088

Naperville Location

25w471 Plank Road,

Naperville, IL 60563

Phone. 630-355-4000

Spring Hours

 Monday-Friday: 9:00am-7:00pm
Saturday: 9:00am-5:00pm
Sunday: 11:00am-5:00pm 


Growing for the future with
right plants in right places.